Conference Tours

Seattle, Washington | March 10-13, 2016

All tours will be held regardless of weather. Please wear weather-appropriate attire and comfortable shoes. Public transportation (bus, light-rail or monorail) or walking will be used to get to and from all tours.  The tours on Friday and Saturday are included in the cost of registration.

Thursday, March 10. 3:30-6:00pm.

Pioneer Square: From Wilderness to Metropolis

Two-hour walking tour led by a Seattle Architecture Foundation Tour Guide. Cost: $25. Dinner costs not included in tour fee. Limited to 20 participants.

The history of Seattle reads like a funky fairy tale on the brick facades of these hallowed blocks. Stand on the spot where our city fathers waded ashore to found their metropolis. Wander back and forth across the line that once separated polite society from one of America’s most notorious vice districts. Through a gold rush, a Great Fire, and too many re-births to count, Pioneer Square has remained at the heart of Seattle’s identity. And now, with a new crop of chefs, entrepreneurs, developers, and community groups all staking their claims, Pioneer Square is preparing to absorb yet another layer of Seattle’s story.

PioneerSquare
Pioneer Square

The Seattle Architecture Foundation (http://seattlearchitecture.org/) connects people to the architecture, design and history of Seattle and educates people about their built environment. SAF Tour Guides are volunteers who receive extensive training in architectural styles, Seattle history and more. Some of them are design professionals (architects, landscape architects, interiors designers, etc.) while others are community volunteers from all walks of life.

Thursday, March 10. 6:30-8:30pm

Option for mini-group dinner in Pioneer Square neighborhood.

Dinner costs not included in tour fee.


Friday, March 11. (See times below.)

These tours run concurrently. Free with registration.

Option 1: Pike Place Market.  1:15-2:30pm.

PikePlaceMarket2
Pike Place Market

One-hour walking tour that will take you inside the main thoroughfares of the Market as well as the Lower Levels where hidden treasures await. At 105 years old, the Market is the oldest continuously operating market in the United States. The original Starbucks and Sur La Table stores can be found here, as well as the world famous fish throwing Pike Place Fish boys. It is also home to more than 200 year-round commercial businesses; 190 craftspeople; and approximately 100 farmers who rent table space by the day.

The original Starbucks and Sur La Table stores can be found here, as well as the world famous fish throwing Pike Place Fish boys. It is also home to more than 200 year-round commercial businesses; 190 craftspeople; and approximately 100 farmers who rent table space by the day.

Option 2: Seattle Public Library.  1:30-2:30pm.

One-hour tour of the library’s architecture and the use of floors and spaces. The Seattle Public Library’s Central Library is the flagship of the Seattle Public Library system. The 11-story building was opened to the public in 2004 and designed by Rem Koolhaas and Joshua Prince-Ramus of OMA. (The library will not be open for touring during the ARLIS/VRA reception on Friday night).

SeattlePublicLibraryinterior
Seattle Public Library

Saturday, March 12. 10:00am-12:30pm.*

University of Washington Campus Architecture Tour: “Building a Polyvalent Campus, 1895-2015” Free with registration.

*Includes travel time to campus. Tour starts at 11:00am at the George Washington statue in front of Henry Art Gallery.

Walking tour which will survey the architectural history of the University of Washington Campus, 1895-2015. The University of Washington was founded in 1861 on a site now occupied by the Fairmont Olympic Hotel downtown, but was relocated to its current site to provide additional space in the early 1890s. State funds in the 1890s through about 1909 were meager, and the number of completed buildings few. In 1909, the Regents of the UW agreed to allow the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (AYPE) to stage its fair on largely vacant university land. The construction of the AYPE made an indelible imprint on the campus, leaving behind an organizational framework still relevant today. The first large building spurt came between 1917 and the mid-1930s. The main quadrangles were planned and built at this time, setting the collegiate Gothic tone for the campus. Building diminished during the Depression and war-time era, only to resume with a second immense surge in the 1950-1970  period. Contextualism held sway during the 1980s and 1990s while the period after 2000 has been  a third building explosion centered in the sciences. During this 120-year span, the campus has grown from one of ethnic/gender exclusivity and siloed departments to one of multi-culturalism and interdisciplinarity, with disparate groups blending and synthesizing academic and social interests.

UnivofWash
University of Washington

 

Saturday, March 12. 3:30-6:30pm.*

Pike/Pine: Change on a Urban Scale

Two-hour walking tour led by a Seattle Architecture Foundation Tour Guide. Free with Registration. The tour will be divided into two groups.

*Includes travel time from UW. Tour itself is 120 minutes.

Long known as the center of Seattle’s counterculture, this urban neighborhood is in the midst of a building boom, and some fear Pike/Pine’s unique character is under threat. From its beginnings as a quiet residential district to its time as Seattle’s first ‘Auto Row’ and its later role as the heart of the local LGBT community, Pike/Pine has always been defined by change. Its story is written in the buildings and streetscapes that help give the neighborhood its character. Can this character be preserved amidst all the new development? Decide for yourself as we explore the past, present, and future of one of Seattle’s most dynamic districts.

PikePinetour2
Pike/Pine

The Seattle Architecture Foundation (http://seattlearchitecture.org/) connects people to the architecture, design and history of Seattle and educates people about their built environment. SAF Tour Guides are volunteers who receive extensive training in architectural styles, Seattle history and more. Some of them are design professionals (architects, landscape architects, interiors designers, etc.) while others are community volunteers from all walks of life.


(NOTE: daylight savings at 2:00am: spring forward)

Sunday, March 13. 9:30am-12:00pm.*

The Future Remembered Walking Tour of Seattle Center

Walking tour led by Join HistoryLink.org staff historian Paula Becker. Cost: $20. Limited to 20 participants.

*Includes travel time. Tour itself is 90 minutes and travel time each way is 30 minutes.

The 1962 Seattle World’s Fair — Century 21 Exposition — looked optimistically forward to imagine the future. The fair drew 10 million visitors, remarkable for an event staged in what was then a lesser-known city far from the public eye. Fair planners wanted to dazzle visitors, and they wanted the six-month fair to leave a physical legacy, a civic center where arts, culture, and community involvement could flourish: Seattle Center. Using a 74-acre (13 square block) site on the far outskirts of downtown, coordinating architect Paul Thiry’s plan utilized several existing buildings combined with new architecture, some of which would make history.

seattlecenter
Seattle Center

The tour will focus on the Century 21 Exposition’s lasting architectural legacy. Buildings will include Minoru Yamasaki’s United States Science Pavilion (now Pacific Science Center), Paul Thiry’s Washington State Coliseum (now KeyArena) and other surviving Thiry buildings; Mercer Arts Corridor buildings; John Graham & Company’s Space Needle; and others. (Exteriors only.)

Paula Becker is the author of The Future Remembered: The 1962 Seattle World’s Fair and Its Legacy (available at amazon.com) co-written with Alan J. Stein. She is featured in the documentary films When Seattle Invented The Future: The 1962 World’s Fair, which aired on PBS stations nationwide; and Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition: Washington’s Forgotten World’s Fair, which aired on Seattle’s KCTS-9; and Structural Engineers of the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair, which she narrated. She was an author of Seattle Center’s Historic Landmark Study, and of the nomination that gained landmark status for Seattle Center’s Northwest Rooms and International Fountain Pavilion.